The Death of the Office Friendship

“Work is so important,” Tsedal Neeley is saying to me one recent afternoon, as we chat via Zoom. “Not just for the economic aspect that people talk about, but the social and developmental aspects as well.” Neeley, a lively and engaging woman who’s a professor at Harvard Business School and author of the recent book Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere, is talking with me about work relationships—what lies beneath them, how they’re likely to evolve in the years ahead, and why it all matters. “Work gives us social connections, professional friends, personal friends.” She sums it up in one word: “Nourishment.”
Read more: The Death of the Office Friendship

Five Ways to Give Better Gifts, According to Science

Social connection contributes significantly to our happiness and well-being, and gift giving can help reinforce the ties that are important to us, says Michael Norton, PhD, a professor at Harvard Business School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who specializes in studying how decision-making affects well-being. “Gift-giving is a sign we care about the people in our lives,” Dr. Norton says.
Read more: Five Ways to Give Better Gifts, According to Science

TEC Members Interview the Authors of the Books That Have Influenced Them

Published weeks before Covid hit the U.S., the title Think Outside the Building foreshadows the unpredictable, pandemic-forced work from home experiment and ensuing debate over the future of the office itself. But the title is meant to symbolize much more than just physical structures. “Buildings are a powerful metaphor for all the established structures … all the things that confine us to thinking a certain way or only talking to people exactly like us,” said author and Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter. The book is really a book about leadership and is based on dozens of case studies from Harvard’s Advanced Leadership Institute, which Kanter co-founded in 2005.
Read more: TEC Members Interview the Authors of the Books That Have Influenced Them

Job Hunting Nightmare: 1,000 Plus Job Applications and Still No Offers

“So, you have this, this system that systematically excludes people that may not check every box in the employer’s description of what they’re looking for, but can be highly qualified on multiple parameters, even those the most important for job success, but they still get excluded,” Fuller, professor of management practice at Harvard Business School said. “But what happens is, the employer in setting up these filters and ranking systems emphasizes some skills over others, intended to rely on two factors to make a decision.”
Read more: Job Hunting Nightmare: 1,000 Plus Job Applications and Still No Offers

When Forecasts Go Wrong: What Caused the Chip Shortage That Threatens Holiday Shopping

The big strain on chip demand is having unintended consequences, potentially worsening the shortage. Manufacturers unable to get sufficient supply have started to hoard the chips they can find. “But one of the things that’s making it worse right now is manufacturers are trying to stockpile additional chips, because you can’t assemble a product unless you have everything, right?” Harvard Business School Professor of Management Willy Shih said.
Read more: When Forecasts Go Wrong: What Caused the Chip Shortage That Threatens Holiday Shopping

The Nasdaq Mandate Will Expand Diversity in Business—And That’s Good for Business

The recently implemented Nasdaq Board Diversity Rule, approved by the Securities and Exchange Commission in April, is one step along the way toward achieving equity in the business community. The mandate requires companies to publicly disclose the gender and racial makeup of their boards and should be followed by similar requirements around executive leadership, particularly the for C-suite. Policies like this, when done right, have the power to continue to drive change and create equity in the boardroom and beyond.
Read more: The Nasdaq Mandate Will Expand Diversity in Business—And That’s Good for Business